Amnesty International (1990) en Sum (1992)

Bijlage bij het dag­boek­ver­slag van 18 augustus 1992

In de evaluatie van mijn reis door Sy­rië en Tur­kije in 1992 ver­wijs ik ver­schil­len­de ke­ren naar de pu­bli­ca­tie van Am­nesty In­ter­na­tio­nal (AI) Re­port 1990 waar­in kri­tiek op de ge­schon­den men­sen­rech­ten van po­li­tie­ke ge­van­gen en ge­we­tens­ge­van­gen (‘priso­ners of con­scien­ce‘) in bei­de lan­den ver­woord wordt.
Hier­be­ne­den komt eerst Sy­rië en daar­na Tur­kije uit die pu­bli­ca­tie van Am­nesty In­ter­na­tio­nal aan de or­de. Dan volgt de in­te­gra­le trans­crip­tie van het ver­slag van twee (un­der­cover) jour­na­lis­ten dat het tijd­schrift Sum in sep­tem­ber 1992 pu­bli­ceer­de over hun ver­blijf in Sy­rië. Ik sluit af met (de vier) scans van de tekst van ge­noem­de pu­bli­ca­tie in Sum. Dit om­dat ik de bron van dit tijd­schrift niet op in­ter­net kan vin­den. De bron van Am­nesty In­ter­na­tio­nal Re­port 1990 heb ik wel op in­ter­net ge­tra­ceerd.


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tio­nal Re­port 1990: Turkije.
Tijdschrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Syrië: TekstScans.
Het dagboekverslag van 18 augustus 1992.


Bron: Amnesty International Report 1990


 
Bladzijde-kolom 228-A, 228-B, 229-A, 229-B, 230-A.
 

Syria [Page 227-B]

Thousands of political prisoners, including hundreds of prisoners of conscience, continued to be detained under state of emergency legislation in force since 1963. The majority were held without charge or trial. Some had been held for over 20 years. Others remained in prison after the expiry of their sentences. However, more than 320 untried political detainees, including three prisoners of conscience, were released during 1989. Torture of prisoners was said to be widespread and routine, and one “disappearance” was reported. One person was executed.

Thousands of suspected government opponents arrested in Syria and in Syrian controlled areas of Lebanon continued to be detained without trial. At least 122 more were arrested during the year. Among those [Page 228-A] detained were 286 prisoners of conscience and 178 others who may have been prisoners of conscience. Many were suspected members of prohibited political parties or Palestinian groups, such as Hizb al-‘Amal al-Shuyu’i, Party for Communist Action (PCA); al-Hizb al-Shuyu’i al-Maktab al-Siyassi, Communist Party Political Bureau (CPPB); al-Ikhwan al-Muslimun, Muslim Brotherhood; al-Tanzim al-Sha’bi al-Nasiri, Popular Nasserist Organization (PNO); Democratic Front for the Liberation of Palestine (DFLP); Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP); Fatah; Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine-General Command (PFLP-GC); Harakat al-Tawhid al-Islami, Islamic Unification Movement (lUM); and the pro-Iraqi Arab Socialist Ba’th Party.

Fourteen CPPB members were arrested between February and June and held without charge or trial in Damascus, Saidnaya and Tartus. Four of them were released uncharged in September (see below). The 10 others were still in detention without charge or trial at the end of the year. They included Fawwaz Hammuda, a laboratory technician from Deir al-Zor, who was held in Saidnaya Prison.


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: Begin SyriëTurkije.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Sy­rië: TekstScans.
Het dagboekverslag van 18 augustus 1992.


[Syria cont’d.]
In April Syrian forces reportedly arrested a number of people in West Beirut and Zahle suspected of cooperating with the mainly Christian army brigades loyal to General Michel ‘Aoun (see Lebanon). In May over 100 others were reportedly arrested by Syrian forces in West Beirut following demonstrations protesting against the killing of Shaikh Hassan Khaled on 16 May (see Lebanon). It was not possible, however, to obtain further details of these arrests. Between April and August, Syrian forces arrested 14 suspected members of the pro-Iraqi Ba’th Party in Tripoli and the Beka’ Valley, but it was not known where they were held. At least 69 Palestinians suspected of being members of Fatah or of supporting Yasser ‘Arafat, Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), were also reported to have been arrested during the year by Syrian security forces in Lebanon. Most were arrested near the Sabra, Chatila, Burj al-Barajneh, Mar Elias and Tal al-Za’tar refugee camps in Beirut, or near other Palestinian refugee camps in Sidon and Tyre in southern Lebanon.

Some of those detained were reportedly arrested by Amal, a predominantly Shi’a militia in Lebanon, and later handed over [Page 228-B] to Syrian troops. These included three brothers arrested in Tyre and Sidon on 27 October. Two of them, Khalil and Muhammad Khattab, were released two days later, but the fate of the third, Ibrahim Khattab, remained unknown. In November Amal reportedly arrested 25 PFLP-GC members in southern Lebanon on suspicion of cooperating with anti-Syrian Palestinian factions in the area. They were reportedly handed over to Syrian intelligence, and their fate remained unknown. Among them were Mahmud Musleh and Kamel al-Haj, leading PFLP-GC figures in southern Lebanon.

Political detainees arrested in previous years continued to be held without charge or trial. Some had been in detention for over 20 years. Ahmad Suwaidani, a former army officer, diplomat and member of the Ba’th Party’s Regional Command, was arrested in 1969. He was held in al-Mezze Prison, Damascus. In July he went on hunger-strike to protest against his continued detention without charge or trial. Three members of the Jewish community arrested in 1987 and 1988 (see Amnesty International Report 1989) were also still held without charge or trial in ‘Adra Civil Prison. The whereabouts of two of them, Eli and Selim Swed, remained unknown until October, when relatives were allowed to visit them.


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: Begin SyriëTurkije.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Sy­rië: TekstScans.
Het dagboekverslag van 18 augustus 1992.


[Syria cont’d.]
Some 450 people arrested between August 1987 and March 1988 on suspicion of supporting the PCA were believed to have remained in detention without trial (see Amnesty International Report 1989). A further 111 CPPB members arrested between 1980 and 1988 were also among those who remained in detention without charge or trial throughout 1989. Among them was Ghassan Khouri, an architect and university lecturer from Deir ‘Atiyya. Arrested in May 1988 by Amn al-Dawla, State Security, he was held in al-Sadat detention centre in Damascus. Jalal Khanji and Riad Bastati, who were among 80 members of the Syrian Engineers’ Association arrested in 1980 after demanding political reforms, remained in detention without charge or trial in ‘Adra Prison. The whereabouts of most of those arrested with them were unknown.

More than 320 untried political detainees, three of whom were prisoners of conscience, were released. Of these, about 160 had been arrested by Syrian forces in Lebanon. ‘Issam ‘Abd al-Latif, a member of [Page 229-A] the DFLP’s Political Bureau, and Salah Salah, the PFLP’S representative in Lebanon, were released in January. They had been held without charge or trial for 23 and 10 months respectively. Three lawyers, all prisoners of conscience, were released in April: Salim ‘Aqil, Thuraya ‘Abd al-Karim and ‘Abd al-Majid Manjouneh had been detained since 1980. A member of the Syrian Engineers’ Association also detained since 1980, ‘Abd al-Majid Abu Sha’la, was released in May. In June 140 Palestinians, all said to be supporters of Yasser ‘Arafat, were released , as were 45 IUM members or supporters. Many had been detained for over five years. Nineteen CPPB members were released between July and October; they had been detained for periods ranging between three and 18 months. In November, 117 IUM members or supporters were released. In December three members of the Jewish community were released from ‘Adra Prison: Albert and Victor Laham and Zaki Mamroud had been held in detention without trial for two years. During the year information was also received of the release in late 1988 of two CPPB members held in detention without trial since May 1988, including Butros ‘Abd al-Massih (see Amnesty International Report 1989).

The routine torture and ill-treatment of prisoners continued to be widely reported. Prisoners were also frequently reported to have been denied medical treatment. Among the victims were four Palestinians – Hassan Dib Khalil, Fayez ‘Arafat, Diab Muhammad Mustafa and Muhammad Dawud. They were held without charge or trial in Fara’ al-Tahqiq al-‘Askari, Military Interrogation Branch, in Damascus. All were members of Fatah arrested in Lebanon in 1983 and 1985 and reportedly tortured on various occasions since then, including in 1989. In November they were reported to be in a critical condition after being denied medical treatment for injuries resulting from torture and for ailments contracted as a result of prolonged detention and poor prison conditions.


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: Begin SyriëTurkije.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Sy­rië: TekstScans.
Het dagboekverslag van 18 augustus 1992.


[Syria cont’d.]
Testimonies alleging torture were also received from former detainees arrested in previous years in Syria and Lebanon. One was from a Palestinian released in late 1988 after being held for 21 months at ‘Anjar detention centre in Lebanon and Fara’ Falastin, Palestine Branch, in Damascus as a suspected PLO member. He [Page 229-B] said he had been tortured with electric shocks, beaten all over his body and partially asphyxiated by having his head immersed in water. Another was from a Lebanese member of the pro-Iraqi Ba’th Party arrested in June 1988 and held for 42 days at the Madrasat al-Amrican, American School, in Tripoli. He said he had been beaten and flogged for long periods, given electric shocks and hung by his wrists from the ceiling with nylon rope. He also said he was tied to a metal chair, the back of which was bent so as to put severe strain on his spine, neck and limbs, causing him to lose consciousness. Another Palestinian suspected of PLO membership arrested at Damascus airport in September 1988 and held for almost a month in Fara’ Falastin was allegedly tortured both during and after interrogation. According to his testimony, he was flogged and beaten with metal cables while naked, and subjected to falaqa (beating on the soles of the feet) for prolonged periods.

Mudar al-Jundi, an engineer from Tartus arrested in September 1987 on suspicion of supporting the PCA, was held in Fara’ Falastin in Damascus after his arrest. He was reportedly tortured during interrogation in 1987, denied medical treatment for acute asthma, and then “disappeared”. His whereabouts remained unknown.

One execution was reported in 1989. Ahmad ‘Abdallah Ahmad was publicly executed by hanging in Tartus in June after being convicted of murder and armed robbery.

Amnesty International repeatedly expressed concern to the government about the continued detention without trial of prisoners of conscience and other political prisoners, and about reports of torture and ill-treatment of detainees. In June an Amnesty International delegation attending an international meeting in Syria met Vice-President ‘Abd al-Halim Khaddam and other government officials, the first such contact since 1978. The delegation urged the release of prisoners of conscience and the prompt, fair trial or release of other untried political detainees, the impartial investigation of torture allegations and deaths in custody, and abolition of the death penalty. Government officials said they would be prepared to establish contact with Amnesty International and in future would respond to its inquiries. The organization presented the names of over [Page 230-A] 400 untried political detainees, among them prisoners of conscience. The officials stated they would examine them and respond in detail. However, the government had provided no further information about these prisoners by the end of 1989.

In an oral statement delivered to the United Nations (UN) Commission on Human Rights in February, Amnesty International drew attention to reports of the routine torture of political detainees by Syrian security forces, consequent deaths in custody and the failure of the government to investigate complaints of torture. There was no response from Syrian Government representatives. On 8 March the Commission on Human Rights announced its decision to drop Syria from consideration by the UN under a procedure established by Economic and Social Council Resolutions 728F/1503. Amnesty International had made a submission to the UN under this procedure in April 1988, drawing attention to a consistent pattern of human rights violations in Syria and Syrian-controlled areas of Lebanon (see Amnesty International Report 1989).


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: Syrië.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Sy­rië: TekstScans.
Het dagboekverslag van 18 augustus 1992.


Bron: Amnesty International Report 1990


 
Bladzijde-kolom 238-B, 239-A, 239-B, 240-A, 240-B.
 

Turkey [Page 238-A]

Thousands of people were imprisoned for political reasons, including hundreds of prisoners of conscience. Political trials in military and state security courts did not meet international standards of fair trial. The use of torture continued to be widespread and systematic, in some cases resulting in death. Civilian and military courts passed at least 10 death sentences. At the end of the year 255 people under sentence of death had exhausted all appeals and their sentences awaited ratification by parliament. Iranian asylumseekers, including some recognized as refugees by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), were forcibly returned to Iran.

In November Prime Minister Turgut Özal was elected President. At the end of the year a state of emergency was still in force in eight provinces in southeast Turkey where the security forces were engaged in counterinsurgency operations against Kurdish secessionist guerrillas. Many human rights violations [Page 238-B] by the security forces were alleged to have taken place in the context of this conflict. The guerrillas were also reported to have carried out attacks on the civilian population, taking prisoners and torturing and killing some of them.

Draft amendments to the Penal Code to shorten the maximum detention period and grant lawyers access to detainees in police custody were announced by the cabinet in September. A prime-ministerial decree of the same month gave detainees access to their lawyers in some exceptional cases, but not to their families and doctors. The proposed measures fell short of internationally recognized standards and did not go before the Grand National Assembly during 1989.

The independent Human Rights Association estimated that there were approximately 5,000 political prisoners at the end of 1989. They included hundreds of prisoners of conscience, among them members of political organizations, trade unions and banned Kurdish groups, as well as journalists and religious activists.

Hundreds of people were prosecuted during 1989 for membership of banned non-violent political parties, under Article 141 of the Penal Code. Among them were some 20 people who returned to Turkey after years in exile. In September Hüseyin Hasançebi, S. Ekrem Çakiroglu and Tektas Agaoglu were detained on arrival in Istanbul . They were committed to Sagmalcilar Prison and charged with activities on behalf of the Turkish Socialist Workers’ Party (TSIP). On 3 November they were released, but at the end of the year their trial continued in Istanbul State Security Court.


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: SyriëBegin Turkije.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Sy­rië: TekstScans.
Het dagboekverslag van 18 augustus 1992.


[Turkey cont’d.]
Another group of exiles who returned in September included Ahmet Kardam, Seref Yildiz and Mehmet Bozisik, who publicly announced that they were members of the Central Committee of the banned Turkish United Communist Party (TBKP). They were sent to prison and charged under Articles 141 and 142 (“making communist propaganda”). Their trial was due to start on 19 January 1990 in Istanbul State Security Court.

The trial of Haydar Kutlu and Nihat Sargin, leaders of the TBKP imprisoned since November 1987, which had started in mid-1988 in Ankara State Security Court, was still continuing at the end of 1989 (see Amnesty International Report 1989).

[Page 239-A] The sentences passed under Article 141 on Ali Ugur and six other alleged members of the Turkish Communist Party (TKP) in November 1988 by Izmir State Security Court were confirmed in May by the appeal court. The six, who had been released pending appeal, were reimprisoned (see Amnesty International Report 1989). Ali Ugur had been kept in detention since his arrest.

The Minister of the Interior stated that 4,426 people were detained between January and June in southeast Turkey where most of the population is of Kurdish origin. Of these, 1,558 had been charged. Most of the Kurdish political prisoners known to Amnesty International were charged with violent offences, but some were prisoners of conscience held for nonviolent political or cultural activities.

In February six members of the Kayseri Branch of the legal Socialist Party (SP) were charged under Article 142 and taken to Kayseri Closed Prison. They had expressed hopes for the freedom and liberties of Kurdish and Turkish citizens and had condemned “state terror” in southeast Turkey in a telegram. In May they were convicted by Kayseri State Security Court and sentenced to 50 months’ imprisonment. However, the verdict was quashed by the appeal court in October and the prisoners were released.


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: SyriëBegin Turkije.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Sy­rië: TekstScans.
Het dagboekverslag van 18 augustus 1992.


[Turkey cont’d.]
Trials of religious activists charged under Article 163 for “attempting to change the secular nature of the State” continued. Münip and Ömer Erdem had been imprisoned since mid-1988 on charges of leadership of the brotherhood of the Nurcus, an alleged anti-secular organization. In 1988 they were convicted by Izmir State Security Court but in June the appeal court quashed the sentence. They were retried by Izmir State Security Court in October on a fresh charge and sentenced to 50 months’ imprisonment, but released pending further appeal.

Writers, publishers and journalists wore imprisoned under various articles of the Penal Code, including Article 142, Article 159 (“insulting the State authorities”) and Article 312 (“incitement to commit a crime”). Some of them were also charged under Article 141.

Celal Gül and Mehmet Bayrak, co-owners of a political journal, Özgür Gelecek, and Bekir Kesen, the editor-in-chief, were detained on 22 July in Ankara. Their jour- [Page 239-B] nal had reported a speech about the situation of Kurdish women, given at a women’s congress in June by Nuray Özkan, a doctor. She was charged with making separatist propaganda. The other three were charged with membership of a banned Kurdish organization, Özgürlük Yolu, Path of Freedom. Nuray Özkan was released on 27 September, the others on 6 October, but the trial of all four was still in progress at the end of the year.

Many political prisoners have been sentenced to imprisonment or death after unfair trials. Although martial law was lifted in 1987, trials before military courts continued. Over 60,000 people were sentenced by military courts during the 1980s. Some defendants had been held in pre-trial detention for more than eight years. Since 1984 thousands of political prisoners have been tried before state security courts. Both military and state security courts have failed to investigate allegations of torture and in some cases have permitted statements extracted under torture to be used as evidence. In addition, most defendants have not been granted facilities for an adequate defence.

There were many new allegations of widespread and systematic torture of political and criminal detainees and prisoners. Even children were among the reported victims. The same methods of torture were reported by almost all detainees: blindfolding and being stripped naked, beatings on all parts of the body, particularly the soles of the feet (falaqa), hosing with ice-cold water and applying electric shocks.

In most cases the victims were held incommunicado in police stations, but allegations of torture and ill-treatment also came from high-security prisons for political prisoners, known as E- and L-type prisons.

One case was that of Salih Zeyrek, aged 19. In July he and seven villagers from Sirnak district were interrogated for over 10 days at the local rural police station. Salih Zeyrek said that he was confined in a closed barrel for 24 hours. In addition to the July heat, cotton wool was burned on the lid. The others were forced into the barrel in turn. Those not in the barrel were constantly beaten.


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: SyriëBegin Turkije.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Sy­rië: TekstScans.
Het dagboekverslag van 18 augustus 1992.


[Turkey cont’d.]
Oguz Yaman, a defendant accused of ill belonging to a banned organization, testified in court that in Mersin Police Headquarters he was stripped naked, his [Page 240-A] legs and arms were tied to the ground and he was given electric shocks to his penis and other parts of his body. He said that he was then hosed with ice-cold water. This testimony was typical of hundreds received during the year.

Some prisoners were reported to have died following torture and ill-treatment. Mehmet Yalçinkaya and Hüseyin Hüsnü Eroglu, imprisoned for alleged membership of a banned Kurdish organization, died on 2 August. They had been on hunger-strike for 35 days in Eskisehir Prison. On 2 August they and 257 other hunger-striking prisoners were transferred to Aydin Prison in metal vans ventilated only by a small hole in the back, despite the heat. When the 15-hour journey was over, they were reportedly stripped naked, hosed with ice-cold water and beaten. The Public Prosecutor in Aydin announced that an autopsy had established that the two prisoners died of dehydration. However, a second autopsy on Hüseyin Hüsnü Eroglu reportedly also found bruises on his body.

At least 10 people were sentenced to death by military and civilian courts. Other death sentences were confirmed by appeal courts. By the end of the year the number of people under sentence of death who had exhausted all judicial appeals had reached 255. Draft amendments to the Penal Code announced by the cabinet in September would reduce the 29 offences carrying a mandatory death penalty by 13. However, the changes referred to provisions hardly ever used.

Hundreds of Iranians fleeing from persecution in Iran continued to seek refuge in Turkey. Those caught crossing the border without authorization were frequently denied access to the relevant Turkish officials or to the UNHCR to have their asylum claims assessed. Many were summarily returned, including some recognized as refugees by the UNHCR. It emerged that seven members of a Kurdish opposition group in Iran, two of whom had been recognized by the UNHCR, were executed in Iran shortly after being forcibly returned in November 1988.

Amnesty International continued throughout the year to call for the release of prisoners of conscience, for fair and prompt trials for all political prisoners, and for an end to torture and the death penalty. In April Amnesty International submitted to the government a revised list of 219 [Page 240-B] names of prisoners who reportedly had died in custody between December 1979 and March 1989, asking about the cause of death. At the end of the year replies on 174 cases had been received, acknowledging ill-treatment in 41 cases.


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: SyriëBegin Turkije.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Sy­rië: TekstScans.
Het dagboekverslag van 18 augustus 1992.


[Turkey cont’d.]
The Turkish authorities also responded to a number of specific torture allegations raised by Amnesty International. In some cases they stated that investigations were still in progress, in others that medical reports had shown that torture had not been inflicted.

In January Amnesty International published a report on the systematic abuse of human rights in Turkey, followed in October by a further report on torture and unfair trials of political prisoners.

In June Amnesty International wrote to the Prime Minister about three Greek Cypriots, missing since 1974 when they were reportedly taken prisoner by the Turkish Armed Forces (see Amnesty International Report 1975, 1976 and 1978). A reply was received in July from the Turkish Cypriot leader, Rauf Denktas (see Cyprus).

Amnesty International sought to prevent the refoulement of Iranian refugees. It appealed to the Turkish authorities on behalf of a number of individuals and continued to urge that all asylum-seekers be given access to fair procedures for assessing their asylum claims.

Amnesty International delegates observed the trial of 20 alleged members of the Turkish Communist Party/Union (TKP/B) in March in Malatya State Security Court. All 12 defendants present alleged that they had been tortured. In September Amnesty International delegates observed the trial before Izmir Criminal Court of Dr Alpaslan Berktay, President of Izmir Human Rights Association, charged with insulting the authorities for having called torturers “the devil in person”. Dr Berktay was acquitted in October.

In February Amnesty International drew attention to its concerns about torture in an oral statement to the United Nations Commission on Human Rights and in May the organization submitted information about its concerns for United Nations review under a procedure, established by Economic and Social Council Resolutions 728F/1503, for confidential consideration of communications about human rights violations.


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: SyriëTurkije.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Sy­rië: Scans.
Het dagboek­verslag van 18 augustus 1992.


Tijdschrift Sum, september 1992.
[Spel­ling van de tekst, zo­als die gold in 1992.]

Syrië: het meest ge­slo­ten stuk­je wereld

Land in een ver­stik­ken­de houd­greep

Pottekijkers uit het wes­ten ko­men er niet in, jour­na­lis­ten ze­ker niet. Sy­rië, één van de meest ge­slo­ten lan­den voor wes­ter­lin­gen ter we­reld.
Twee Sum-jour­na­lis­ten lukt het als toe­rist het land van ge­hei­me po­li­tie, cor­rup­tie, dic­ta­tuur en eco­no­mische ma­lai­se bin­nen te drin­gen. Ze vin­den on­der­dak bij Sy­rische stu­den­ten en be­gin­nen voor­zich­tig aan hun jour­na­lis­tiek re­laas te wer­ken.

BERNICE ANDERS & PETE FILL

 
Bladzijde-kolom 43-C, 44-A, 44-B, 44-C, 45-A, 45-B, 45-C.
 

[Blz. 43-B] “Hij is mijn held,” zegt Hani, een jon­ge vrouw met wie we net aan de praat zijn ge­raakt. Aan het ein­de van dit au­to­vrije win­kel­straat­je in het cen­trum van Da­mas­cus staat een stand­beeld van de pre­si­dent. Het voet­stuk van zijn ste­nen li­chaam is af­ge­zet met een kleu­rig lint. On­aan­tast­baar. Is hij echt haar held? Ibra­him, een Pa­les­tijn, lokt haar be­dre­ven uit de tent: “Weet je wat As­sad be­te­kent? Leeuw. Maar As­sad is geen leeuw, hij is een rat.” Hij grin­nikt op­ge­won­den, als­of hij de meest on­ze­de­lij­ke ge­dach­ten hard­op ver­woordt. Hani slaat van schrik haar hand voor de mond. “Hou je mond!”, be­veelt ze. Met gro­te ver­schrik­te ogen kijkt ze om zich heen. “Je mag niet pra­ten over zul­ke din­gen.”
Ibrahim gnif­felt ons kwa­jon­gens­ach­tig toe. Hij wist hoe Hani zou rea­ge­ren en lijkt trots nu zijn ver­wach­ting is uit­ge­ko­men. “De ge­hei­me po­li­tie is …” Hani’s stem stokt. Er stapt een man voor­bij in een zwart­le­ren jack, dat hier lijkt door te gaan voor een uni­form voor leden van de ge­hei­me dienst. Hani kijkt als iemand die zijn mond voor­bij heeft ge­praat en nu af­wacht of de an­de­ren dit door heb­ben. Van­uit haar oog­hoe­ken volgt ze de man, die nog even om­kijkt, maar dan om de hoek van een win­kel ver­dwijnt. “Je kunt hier nie­mand ver­trou­wen, zelfs je fa­mi­lie niet,” waar­schuwt ze fluis­te­rend. “Ieder­een kan van de ge­hei­me dienst zijn.”
De pa­ra­noïde toon was snel ge­zet. Als­of er [Blz. 43-C] zo­juist een mi­li­tai­re veld­slag heeft plaats­ge­von­den, zo’n puin­hoop lag er in het grens­ge­bied van Sy­rië. Tal­lo­ze au­to­wrak­ken ston­den een­zaam in het zand langs de ver­la­ten weg. De avond was goed en wel ge­val­len. Mach­tig sta­ken de don­ke­re con­tou­ren van con­tro­le­to­rens af te­gen de bloed­ro­de he­mel. Veel prik­kel­draad. En na el­ke twee­hon­derd me­ter wacht­hou­den­de mi­li­tai­ren, ver­veeld leu­nend te­gen een ver­roest stuk staal of ge­hurkt zit­tend met het ge­weer recht­op tus­sen de knie­ën.
Drie keer dwong een slag­boom de taxi tot stop­pen en door­spit­te een man-in-groen de pas­poor­ten. En over­al het hoofd van de ge­wel­di­ge pre­si­dent van dit land, de gro­te lei­der Ha­fez al-As­sad.
“Iedere Syrische doua­nier be­taalt grof geld om aan de grens te mo­gen wer­ken, om ver­vol­gens geld van de men­sen af te pak­ken,” zou de Pa­les­tijn Ibra­him ons ’s avonds in Da­mas­cus ver­tel­len.
Ibrahim kent hier de regels goed. De little busi­ness­man, zo­als hij zich noemt, pen­delt ge­re­geld op en neer tus­sen Jor­da­nië en Sy­rië om in de schil­der­ach­tige souk van Da­mas­cus kle­ren, drank en si­ga­ret­ten te ko­pen en die in het duur­de­re Am­man op straat met winst van de hand te doen. Hij heeft al­tijd si­ga­ret­ten bij zich voor de Sy­rische douane. De ene keer dat hij ze was ver­ge­ten, had­den ze hem uren­lang vast­ge­houden.

 

Op fluis­te­ren­de toon had hij ons on­ge­vraagd in­ge­licht over dit land. We wa­ren voor [Blz. 44-A] Ibra­him ar­ge­lo­ze toe­ris­ten, en die moest hij toch la­ten we­ten dat Sy­rië niet een door­snee va­kan­tie­land was. Hier kwa­men nau­we­lijks wes­ter­lin­gen, af­ge­zien dan van die en­ke­le ge­tik­te avon­tu­rier aan wie wel een vi­sum was ver­leend. Pot­te­kij­kers uit de wes­ter­se jour­na­lis­tiek kwa­men er ge­woon niet in. Sy­rië stond voor ge­hei­me po­li­tie, cor­rup­tie, dic­ta­tuur, eco­no­mische ma­laise. Bo­ven­dien zat het land strak in de tang van het Baath-re­gi­me. Net als Irak. Het volk was hier net zo bang, dat zou­den we on­ge­twij­feld zelf wel mer­ken.


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: SyriëTurkije.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Syrië: Begin tekstScans.
Het dag­boek­ver­slag van 18 augustus 1992.


Meters­lan­ge span­doeken
“Mijn bloed, mijn leven voor u, pre­si­dent As­sad!,” galmt het door de stra­ten van Da­mas­cus. De stad zit let­ter­lijk ver­stopt. Uit al­le hoe­ken en ga­ten krui­pen lan­ge op­toch­ten van de­mon­stre­ren­de men­sen die al­le­maal roe­pen be­reid te zijn voor hun lei­der te ster­ven. De be­to­gers dra­gen zijn por­tret of me­ters­lan­ge span­doe­ken, be­schil­derd met fel­rode, -groe­ne en -blau­we lof­tui­tin­gen. Ze lij­ken di­rect van hun werk of uit school ge­plukt. Een groep­je meis­jes in wit­te schor­ten mar­cheert ach­ter een tien­tal be­snor­de man­nen in pak met strop­das. Voor hen hup­pelt weer een klas kleu­ters die er in hun groe­ne uni­formp­jes al uit­zien als heu­se sol­daat­jes.
Op de binnen­plaats van een school houdt de de­caan een toe­spraak ter ere van de pre­si­dent. De­mon­stre­ren voor ’s lands lei­der hoort hier bij het le­ven. As­sad en zijn Cor­rec­tie­be­we­ging bin­nen de Baath-par­tij la­ten zich graag ver­heer­lij­ken. En dat kan al­leen met be­hulp van het volk. Wie niet mee­doet aan As­sads thea­ter­stuk­je, kan zijn baan kwijt ra­ken, wordt ge­de­gra­deerd of krijgt een be­zoek­je van een vei­lig­heids­agent. “Mas­sa’s men­sen zwe­ren trouw aan de pre­si­dent,” zo zou de vol­gen­de dag de En­gels­ta­li­ge Sy­ria Ti­mes ope­nen, een re­gel­recht pro­pa­gan­da­dag­blad van de re­ge­ring. We kun­nen ge­rust zijn, ieder­een houdt van Hem.
 
Staatsgreep
Ruim éénentwintig jaar ge­le­den greep As­sad hier de macht. Tot dat mo­ment was Sy­rië sinds de on­af­han­ke­lijk­heid in 1946 ei­gen­lijk van de ene staats­greep in de an­de­re ge­bui­teld. Ieder­een was te­gen ieder­een. De jon­ge Ha­fez groei­de in die tijd op in de ha­ven­stad La­ta­kia, waar hij als min­der­heid men­taal flink werd ge­hard. As­sad is Ala­wiet, een shi­’itische stro­ming bin­nen de is­lam waar­toe on­ge­veer elf pro­cent van de Sy­riërs be­hoort. Tij­dens zijn stu­die­tijd ont­plooi­de Ha­fez zich, net als Sad­dam Hoes­sein in het buur­land Irak, als een fel aan­han­ger van de ideo­lo­gie van de Baath-par­tij, een niet-gods­diens­ti­ge po­li­tie­ke club die streef­de naar so­cia­lis­me en een land voor al­le ara­bie­ren. Dat le­ver­de hem al snel ge­weld­da­di­ge con­flic­ten op met le­den van de sun­ni­tische meer­der­heid, met na­me de fun­da­men­ta­lis­tische Mos­lim­broe­ders, die de toen al [Blz. 44-B] pro­mi­nen­te As­sad al eens let­ter­lijk een mes in zijn rug sta­ken.
Als lid van een ge­hei­me groep Baathis­tische of­fi­cie­ren be­gon de 32-ja­ri­ge As­sad in 1963 zijn tocht naar de macht. In ver­schil­len­de ge­weld­da­di­ge kracht­me­tin­gen met col­le­ga-Baath­lei­ders èn le­den van zijn ge­hei­me mi­li­tai­re co­mi­té, kwam hij tel­kens als over­win­naar uit de strijd. Via het ambt van mi­nis­ter van De­fen­sie vocht hij zich rich­ting pre­si­dent­schap. Bij de fi­na­le coup ze­ven jaar la­ter in 1970 zet­te hij zelfs de mach­ti­ge ge­ne­raal Salah Ja­did ge­van­gen, die van­af het be­gin van As­sads ze­ge­tocht zijn trouw­ste bond­ge­noot was ge­weest en van wie ieder­een dacht dat juist hij de touwt­jes in han­den had. Nog steeds zit Ja­did met een aan­tal vrien­den er­gens in een Sy­rische ge­van­ge­nis weg te kwij­nen.


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: SyriëTurkije.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Sy­rië: Begin tekstScans.
Het dagboekverslag van 18 augustus 1992.


Alleenheerschappij
Onder As­sad kent Sy­rië de meest sta­bie­le pe­rio­de in haar ge­schie­de­nis. De pre­si­dent ge­niet min of meer al­leen­heer­schap­pij. Hij is op­per­be­vel­heb­ber van het le­ger en se­cre­ta­ris-ge­ne­raal van de al­les­be­heer­sen­de Baath-par­tij. Of­fi­cieel be­rust het wet­ge­ven­de ge­zag bij een door het volk ge­ko­zen volks­ver­ga­de­ring. Maar op­po­si­tie is ver­bo­den in Sy­rië. Po­li­tie­ke par­tij­en naast de Baath-par­tij zijn slechts toe­ge­staan met goed­keu­ring van de over­heid. Het par­le­ment be­staat dus per de­fi­ni­tie uit [Blz. 44-C] ap­plau­dis­seurs, net zo­als de vak­bon­den.
De macht van As­sad staat of valt met de ge­hei­me diens­ten, ze­ven in ge­tal. In de buurt van de meest on­be­lang­rij­ke [sic] ge­bou­wen han­gen ze rond, de man­nen in don­kere le­de­ren jacks en een ka­lash­ni­kov voor de borst. Of ze re­ge­len het ver­keer. Ge­wo­ne po­li­tie-au­to’s zie je nau­we­lijks. Wel veel com­for­ta­be­le wes­ter­se per­so­nen­au­to’s met de cij­fers 35 of 36 op het num­mer­bord, waar­van de Pa­les­tijn Ibra­him wist dat dat voer­tui­gen zijn van de ge­vrees­de Mu­kha­ba­rat.
 
Presidentshoofd
’s Middags op straat schiet een jon­gen van­uit de men­sen­mas­sa op ons af en steekt een fo­to van het pre­si­den­ten­hoofd toe. Na een mo­ment aar­ze­len wei­ge­ren we be­leefd. Hoe­wel ver­baasd door de af­wij­zing, blijft hij aan­drin­gen: “Waar­om wil­len jul­lie de fo­to niet?” We heb­ben niets met hem ge­meen, hij is onze pre­si­dent niet. Ha­ni is met ons mee­ge­lo­pen en heeft het zicht­baar moei­lijk. “Jááá, ik wil hem wel!,” roept ze plot­se­ling over­dre­ven en­thou­siast. Gre­tig grijpt ze de prent uit de han­den van de jon­gen, kijkt stra­lend naar het hoofd van de lei­der en juicht: “Ik houd van hem. As­sad. As­sad!” Maar zo gauw de jon­gen weer in de op­tocht is ver­dwe­nen, loopt haar op­tre­den ab­rupt ten ein­de. Voor het eerst toont ze ge­voe­lens die tot dan toe per­fect ver­bor­gen zijn ge­hou­den. “Ik wil dit ding niet,” [Blz. 45-A] zegt ze zacht. “Hier.” We wei­ge­ren con­se­quent. “Als­je­blieft, neem het. Ik haat dit.”
Twee jon­ge­tjes fiet­sen voor­bij. “Hé, pssst, kom ‘ns,” fluis­tert ze naar hen. Even kijkt ze om zich heen, dan drukt ze het kar­ton­nen hoofd van As­sad te­gen de borst van het voor­ste jochie. “Pak aan,” be­veelt ze en loopt strak door.
 
’s Avonds schuift de pre­si­dent op de te­le­vi­sie voor­bij, ge­volgd door een groep­je meis­jes die niet bo­ven de me­ter uit­ko­men en die de po­pu­lai­re slo­gan roe­pen ‘Mijn bloed, mijn leven…’
“Tss, moet je dat ho­ren,” sist stu­dent Ad­nan. Af­keu­rend schudt hij zijn hoofd. “Ze be­grij­pen niet eens wat ze zeg­gen. Dit ge­beurt om de ha­ver­klap. Bij el­ke ge­le­gen­heid moe­ten de men­sen de straat op. Maar aan mij is die on­zin niet be­steed. Het is niet echt.” Ha­kem grin­nikt wat on­ge­mak­ke­lijk, maar knikt dan in­stem­mend.


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: SyriëTurkije.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Sy­rië: Begin tekstScans.
Het dagboekverslag van 18 augustus 1992.


Oppositie
Hoewel echte op­po­si­tie in Sy­rië ver­bo­den is, be­staat die wel, on­der­gronds. Riad Türk bij voor­beeld, een af­split­sing van de com­mu­nis­tische par­tij van Sy­rië. Of de ge­noem­de sun­ni­tische Mos­lim Broe­der­schap, de groot­ste te­gen­stan­der van As­sad. Het se­cu­lie­re ka­rak­ter van de Baath-par­tij en de ala­wi­tische vriend­jes­po­li­tiek die de pre­si­dent voert, zet nog steeds kwaad bloed. De bes­te func­ties [Blz. 45-B] in het le­ger of bij de over­heid wor­den ver­vuld door ala­wie­ten*(1), vaak ten kos­te van le­den van de sun­ni­tische meer­der­heid.
Dat heeft de af­ge­lo­pen de­cen­nia ge­re­geld ge­leid tot ge­wa­pen­de rel­len en aan­sla­gen van sun­ni­tische groe­pe­rin­gen. In 1980 ont­snap­te As­sad ter­nau­wer­nood aan de dood toen hij een gra­naat nog net van zich af kon gooien die Mos­lim­broe­ders hem had­den toe­ge­wor­pen. Zijn wraak was zoet. Vijf­hon­derd te­gen­stan­ders wer­den die nacht in een ge­van­ge­nis in de woes­tijn af­ge­maakt.
Twee jaar la­ter kwam Ha­ma, een sun­ni­tisch bol­werk in het noor­den van Sy­rië, in op­stand. Vei­lig­heids­agen­ten had­den een groot wa­pen­ar­se­naal van de Mos­lim­broe­ders ont­dekt dat in doods­kis­ten*(2) deels­ge­wijs de stad was bin­nen­ge­smok­keld. De ont­dek­king van de wa­pens was voor de Mos­lim­broe­ders het sig­naal om maar me­teen de to­ta­le aan­val in te zet­ten: de agen­ten wer­den ge­dood en van­af de mos­kee­ën wer­den al­le ge­lo­vi­gen op­ge­roe­pen te re­vol­te­ren te­gen het on­ge­lo­vi­ge Baath-re­gime van As­sad. Baa­thisten wer­den met hak­ma­chi­nes af­ge­slacht. Oor­logs­ta­fe­re­len volg­den. Vei­lig­heids­troe­pen, spe­cia­le een­he­den en de De­fen­sie­bri­ga­des van As­sads broer Ri­faat trok­ken met tanks de stad in en ver­nie­tig­den al­le hui­zen, ker­ken en vrij­wel al­le mos­kee­ën. Wes­ter­se di­plo­ma­ten die in Ha­ma wa­ren, ver­ge­le­ken de ruïnes met Ber­lijn 1945. Het was een ‘eens-en-voor-al­tijd-waar­schu­wing’, met een tak­tiek om van te gru­we­len: zo­veel mo­ge­lijk do­den, ook vrou­wen en kin­de­ren, ook men­sen die niets met de Mos­lim­broe­ders te ma­ken had­den. In som­mi­ge ge­val­len moest één lid van de fa­mi­lie blij­ven le­ven, zo­dat de­ze aan na­be­staan­den zou door­ver­tel­len wat het re­gi­me doet met op­po­san­ten. Exac­te cij­fers over do­den en ge­won­den zijn nau­we­lijks te ach­ter­ha­len; fa­mi­lie­le­den van ver­moor­de bur­gers moch­ten niet eens rouw to­nen, laat staan pra­ten. De schat­tin­gen zijn des­on­danks il­lu­stra­tief ge­noeg: tus­sen de twin­tig- en veer­tig­dui­zend do­den.*(3)
 
Doodsbang
De recente ge­schie­de­nis heeft de men­sen doods­bang ge­maakt. En die angst slaat op den duur over. Het is ver­ba­zing­wek­kend hoe snel en on­ge­merkt je de on­ge­schre­ven, in­ge­wik­kel­de en vrij­heids­be­ro­ven­de ge­drags­re­gels in Sy­rië over­neemt. Op straat praat je niet over po­li­tiek, al­thans niet op de ge­brui­ke­lij­ke, open ma­nier. Zelfs niet met el­kaar. Komt de pre­si­dent on­ver­hoopt toch ter spra­ke, dan noem je niet zijn naam maar heb je het over Hij en Hem. Wil je el­kaar op straat at­tent ma­ken op het zo­veel­ste voor­beeld van ge­re­gis­seer­de ver­af­go­ding van As­sad, dan wijs je dat niet aan maar be­schrijf je met woor­den waar het zich be­vindt. Over­dre­ven voor­zorg is dat niet, ie­de­re dag loopt er wel ie­mand op je hie­len, re­vol­ver non­cha­lant tus­sen de broek­riem, of er zit een man in een re­stau­rant [Blz. 45-C] aan het ta­fel­tje ach­ter je on­ge­ge­neerd mee te luis­te­ren, die je op den duur op qua­si-vrien­de­lijke toon vraagt naar je naam, na­tio­na­li­teit en be­roep.
 
Waarom laten zo­veel men­sen zich en mas­se re­cru­te­ren voor een thea­ter­stuk­je ter ere van de lei­der? “Ik zou ook klap­pen.” Ha­kem klimt op de biecht­stoel. Hij spreekt zacht, lacht soms ver­le­gen en houdt in wan­neer voor­bij­gan­gers bin­nen hoor­be­reik ko­men. “Ik doe het niet graag, maar als ze wil­len dat ik ap­plau­dis­seer voor de pre­si­dent dan doe ik dat. Het­zelf­de geldt voor mijn lid­maat­schap van de Baath-par­tij. Ik zet mijn le­ven voor zo­iets on­be­nul­ligs niet op het spel.”


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: SyriëTurkije.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Sy­rië: Begin tekstScans.
Het dagboekverslag van 18 augustus 1992.


Felste tegenstanders
Sinds jaar en dag heeft Sy­rië ge­gol­den als een van de fel­ste te­gen­stan­ders van het wes­ten, met name de Ver­enig­de Sta­ten, die de ‘Is­raë­lische be­zet­ters van Ara­bisch land’ door de ja­ren heen tel­kens weer de hand bo­ven het hoofd hiel­den. As­sad wil de door de Is­raëli’s in 1967 be­zet­te Go­lan­hoog­te weer te­rug. En daar­voor moet hij nu di­plo­ma­tiek on­der­han­de­len met his­to­rische vij­an­den.
In fe­bru­ari dit jaar ver­kon­dig­de de mi­nis­ter van Bui­ten­land­se Za­ken Fa­rouk al-Shara trots dat hij en zijn “Ne­der­land­se vriend” Van den Broek exact het­zelf­de stand­punt hul­di­gen in de Is­raë­lisch-Ara­bische on­der­han­de­lin­gen.
Drie maanden eer­der in de­cem­ber liet Sy­rië on­ge­veer 2800 ge­van­gen [sic] vrij ‘die de staats­vei­lig­heid in ge­vaar had­den ge­bracht.’
Maar Am­nes­ty In­ter­na­tio­nal waar­schuwt voor over­dre­ven op­ti­mis­me. Nog steeds zit­ten vol­gens de or­ga­ni­sa­tie dui­zen­den men­sen om po­li­tie­ke re­de­nen vast, is de wet op de nood­toe­stand uit 1963 nog van kracht en kun­nen de ge­hei­me diens­ten ie­der­een zon­der vorm van pro­ces ar­res­te­ren. In 1990 stier­ven ten­min­ste vier ge­van­ge­nen als ge­volg van mar­te­lin­gen, waar­on­der het uit­ste­ken van de ogen en toe­die­nen van elek­trische schok­ken. Het­zelf­de aan­tal werd dat jaar pu­blie­ke­lijk op­ge­han­gen in Da­mas­cus.
 
Met een men­ge­ling van me­lig­heid en ge­la­ten­heid tel­len we met Ad­nan en Ha­kem tij­dens de nieuws­uit­zen­ding op te­le­vi­sie het aan­tal keren dat Ha­fez al-As­sad wordt ge­noemd. Tien keer is wei­nig. Na een paar mi­nu­ten is Ad­nan het goed zat. “Ze lie­gen,” schreeuwt hij en drukt drif­tig op de knop­pen van de af­stands­be­die­ning. Nog meer nieuws over As­sad. Die­pe zucht. Op han­den en voe­ten kruipt Ad­nan naar de vi­deo en pakt de dichtst­bij lig­gen­de cas­set­te. Voor de der­de keer vluch­ten we in de fic­tie van Si­len­ce of the lambs.

(De na­men zijn uit vei­lig­heid voor de be­trok­ke­nen ver­an­derd.)


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: SyriëTurkije.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Sy­rië: TekstScans.
Het dagboekverslag van 18 augustus 1992.


GM.: Google Maps, Wi.: Wikipedia.


*(1)
Ala­wie­ten (Wi.) In Sy­rië de gods­diens­ti­ge rich­ting van het re­gi­me. Dit is een min­der­heids­stro­ming. Ik hoor­de in Sy­rië men­sen zeg­gen: “Vroe­ger poets­ten ze on­ze schoe­nen, nu zijn ze hier de baas.”
Het feit dat de Ala­wie­ten nu aan de macht zijn en over de soen­nie­ten (Wi.) heer­sen, is me­de de oor­zaak dat de bur­ger­oor­log in Sy­rië zich zo lang voort­sleept. Wan­neer de Ala­wie­ten hun machts­ba­sis ver­lie­zen (het re­gi­me) wor­den ze weer een ver­volg­de min­der­heid. Na eeu­wen­lange dis­cri­mi­na­tie en ver­vol­gin­gen, wil­len ze de nu ver­kre­gen po­si­tie (be­grij­pe­lij­ker­wijs) niet zo maar op­ge­ven.

Te­rug.

*(2)
Doodskisten. De me­de­de­ling over het ver­voe­ren van wa­pens in doods­kis­ten is een beet­je ver­warr­end, om­dat mos­lims hun do­den ge­woon­lijk be­gra­ven ge­wik­keld in een lijk­wa­de en op een baar naar de be­graaf­plaats dra­gen. Maar het is mo­ge­lijk dat in som­mige ge­val­len lijk­kis­ten wor­den ge­bruikt.

Te­rug.

*(3)
Het bloed­bad van Ha­ma (Wi.)
Hafiz al-Asad (Wi.) liet Hama (GM.), (Wi.) he­le­maal plat bom­bar­de­ren.
… Am­nes­ty In­ter­na­tio­nal es­ti­ma­ted that as many as 20,000 people were kil­led there. I had never seen bru­ta­lity at that scale, and, in a book I wrote later, I gave it a name: “Hama Rules…” (Citaat uit: The Seattle Times)

Te­rug.


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: SyriëTurkije.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Sy­rië: Tekst.
Het dagboekverslag van 18 augustus 1992.



Sum-september 1992: blz. 42


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: SyriëTurkije.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Sy­rië: TekstBegin scans.
Het dagboekverslag van 18 augustus 1992.


Sum-september 1992: blz. 43


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: SyriëTurkije.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Sy­rië: TekstBegin scans.
Het dagboekverslag van 18 augustus 1992.


Sum-september 1992: blz. 44


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: SyriëTurkije.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Sy­rië: TekstBegin scans.
Het dagboekverslag van 18 augustus 1992.


Sum-september 1992: blz. 45


TopEinde

Het Amnesty Inter­na­tional Report 1990: SyriëTurkije.
Tijd­schrift Sum, sep­tem­ber 1992 over Sy­rië: TekstBegin scans.
Het dagboekverslag van 18 augustus 1992.


Over­zicht 1972-1990.
Chrono­lo­gisch over­zicht Orient Ex­press 1992.